Tag Archives: Team

Make or Break your Project?

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The bigger the dream, the more important the team – Robin Sharma

If you go through my blog you’ll see posts that speak about critical success factors for IT business transformation projects. I have talked about the importance of trust, the impact of ambiguity, how to pick the right people, but also vendor performance, dealing with competing priorities and SMART project leadership.

It is not so difficult to BREAK your project; you can do that in a heartbeat. It is much more difficult to MAKE your project. It all comes down to leadership potential of all internal and external stakeholders, because project success is something you create and achieve together as a well-integrated team.

There are a few, silent ‘BREAKERS’ of success that can be detrimental, throw you off track and ultimately force you to pull the plug.

Singing from the same song sheet

Many organizations that initiate an IT business transformation project put their faith completely or way too far in the hands of the vendor. They rely too much on the vendor’s expertise to design, build, test and implement the solution. For these organizations it is a given that the vendor provides industry leading practices to the project. “But that’s why we hired them” is a comment you hear when organizations realize that their expectations are not being met.

Is this an issue caused by the vendor only, or by both the vendor and the organization? It can actually be both. Every organization should develop in-house expertise of the future state solution, otherwise you are not able to define WHAT you want in clearly articulated business requirements. With expertise I mean: knowledge and experience of the business processes, technology and data.

Does it need to be at the same level as the vendor? It must be at least at a point where you can truly understand the options that are being presented by the vendor, and you can identify alternatives that for various reasons do not come forward. Organizations should consider assigning a solution architect (contract or permanent employee) to the project who can bring that level of knowledge and experience. The solution architect functions as a catalyst to other project resources and brings continuity, consistency and integrity of the design to the team. All key resources should be trained in the new technology at the start of the project, preferable by the technology vendor.

The money that the organization spends on building this solid project team capability must be perceived as an investment. It is a risk mitigation activity that has both short term (set project up for success) and long term (effective sustainment) value.

Vendors who embark on IT business transformation projects should encourage the organization to build up their capability right at the start of it and not gradually overtime. It is in their best interest to work with a client organization that sings from the same song sheet, speaks the same language and uses the same communication matrix, from the starts of the design phase onwards. The quality of the solution design drives the value and benefits that the organization has in mind and is expecting to realize.

Silo mentality

It is fairly common that organizations with traditional structures have entities (departments, units, teams, etc.) that operate in silos. We also know that nothing great happens in silos. IT business transformation projects thrive on creativity, collaboration, communication and a multi-disciplinary approach. Organizations can only attract and retain top talent if they move away from this one-dimensional paradigm once and for all. Top talent that is needed to staff the project and future sustainment organization will quickly move on to greener pastures if the organizational culture does not change.

A major risk of silo mentality is that the project will struggle with the “pave the cow path and reinvent the legacy” syndrome. The future state will be not be much different. As a result it does not bring what the organization needs to achieve cost savings, better customer service levels, accurate management information or anything of that kind that makes it better (world-class) than the organization’s peer group. It is not an easy task for the leadership team to successfully deliver the IT business transformation project in this context. What needs to happen?

Executive Leadership can:

  1. Set a new tone for the organization by communicating core values that go with the future state. There are organizations that define core values in a collaborative manner with their people
  2. Clearly articulate the vision, the path to get there, and what contribution is expected from each of the entities
  3. Model the behaviour that is expected
  4. Actively participate in the IT business transformation program with the intention to inspire, motivate and coach people
  5. Set the right business priorities and make timely decisions when needed
  6. Clarify in what functional and technical areas change must happen to achieve major business benefits
  7. Monitor progress and take corrective actions as required
  8. Assign ‘business transformation’ specific performance goals to key leaders
  9. Source top talent from outside the organization that resonates well with the future state
  10. Implement a reward program that encourages people to think, act and speak differently

Project leadership can:

  1. Make sure that project and relevant business objectives, strategy and plans are always aligned and well communicated
  2. Increase focus of change management activities on stakeholder alignment and commitment
  3. Define and enforce solution design principles that drive people, process and technology change
  4. Quickly identify and remove roadblocks on the design path to change, and actively manage integration points or dependencies between entities
  5. Simplify design concepts as much as possible
  6. Implement an escalation path up to the Executive Sponsor to get fast decisions on design issues and risks
  7. Foster a working climate of collaboration, creativity, communication and change
  8. Conduct demonstrations of components of the to be solution to key stakeholders
  9. Implement quick wins where possible and meaningful
  10. Seek for industry leading practices and share that with stakeholders that resist to change

There are a lot of ‘make or break’ project success drivers to think about when you initiate, plan, execute and close an IT business transformation project. Key is to identify and respond to them properly and in a timely fashion. Stay in control of your own destiny by investing in core project team capabilities and by taking the right actions at the Executive and Project level.

Bas de Baat

Program Manager Enterprise Applications, PMP©

AMBIGUITY…

“You can have brilliant ideas, but if you can’t get them across, your ideas won’t get anywhere” – Lee Iacocca

The quote from Lee Iacocca is absolutely true. If you are not able to articulate what you want, you cannot expect that your implementation partner (the Vendor) is able to deliver it to you. Having said that, there is a key component missing. The existence of implementation partners is their expertise and capability to help you define what you want, such that your needs get fulfilled. Oftentimes that is not well understood and/or executed throughout the project life cycle.

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Dilbert (by Scott Adams) hits the nail on the head with his strip about a customer that wanted a swing on a tree. It indicates that there is kind of a ‘broken telephone’ between the project stakeholders. None of them actually truly understood what the customer wanted and all reasoned from their own paradigm and communication matrix.

Let’s say for a minute that there is a mutual understanding of the need between the customer and implementation partner. Can it still go wrong? Absolutely. There are many factors that can still make the outcome of the project not to be acceptable to the customer. Think about lack of quality of work, contractual disputes, shortage of resources, resistance to change, competing business priorities, low trust culture, and so on. Having said that, it appears that proper communication is the main success factor.

It is key to sing from the same song sheet, but how do you make that happen? Here are a number of practical measures:

Make communication meaningful: Many verbal and non-verbal communications can be much better coloured with proper wording and visuals such that they become meaningful for the recipient. I have been in many meetings where people leave the room with a completely different understanding about the outcome; at times the complete opposite. Oftentimes it happens, because the meeting is not well prepared. A very effective way to change that is to have the key messages that you want the recipient to take away, well documented on a single page. Use visuals with key words as much as possible. Acknowledge the response and feedback from the audience by paraphrasing it throughout, and summarizing it at the end of the meeting. Document the outcome and send that with the single page to the participants by email. If the subject comes back in subsequent meetings, start off with setting the base line by sharing what has been discussed to date. You want to avoid ‘wheels to spin’.

Synchronize the different communication matrixes: People with different backgrounds who come together in a project to work collaboratively on achieving the project goals need to be set up for success. That is a key responsibility of the customer as well as the implementation partner. Setting the project and team members up for success entails more than conducting a project kick off and reading the project handbook and other on boarding material. Both organizations need to understand that to be effective as a whole, it is crucial that project staff can ‘speak the same language.’ Train your project staff in the software product, methods and tools, project approach, roles and responsibilities, processes and procedures. Maintain a common set of definitions, templates and guidelines. Make this training a repetitive process as we all tend to forget elements over time. Lunch & Learn sessions are oftentimes an effective instrument

Document along the way: ‘Better have it documented.’ If that is part of your style you’ll go far in projects. In my previous blogpost ‘Continuity of Vision’ I wrote about the different kind of documents that you want to use from start to finish. Critical is to be mindful of the fact that WHAT the organizations wants is changing over time as insight grows and/or priorities change. That is a given and both organizations have to manage that change properly and not be surprised of it to happen. Documenting the requirements, design, build, etc properly and consistently along the way can become crucial and a factor of success or failure for the overall project

Build checkpoints into project approach: It is imperative that the customer wants to see what they get well in advance of the formal acceptance phase. Implementation partners can be difficult when you ask them to demonstrate the product while it is going through the design and build phase. It is perceived as a non-productive step or as a delivery risk, especially in fixed price contracts. Understand that Implementation partners do not always have the capability (read: qualified resources) that they signed up for, or customers may change their minds of WHAT they want after a demonstration and they expect that change to be at no cost. This can all be prevented if both organizations agree what those checkpoints are and how change will be addressed as it occurs

Implement an effective escalation path: When organizations engage and embark upon a new project it is the right time to think about how to deal with conflict, because they will happen and when they do, you don’t want them to become lethal. Most of the time conflicts are about WHAT will (not) be delivered at the end of the day from a quality, cost or time perspective. It makes a lot of sense to consciously think about the escalation process from a business and legal perspective before you start the project. Oftentimes it is done from a legal perspective only, without proper involvement from the business, and then when problems occur, it turns out that what is part of the contract is not what the business wants to pursue. Avoid that from happening and define a pragmatic and effective process that has business and legal support. Think about including a mediation and/or arbitration step in the end-to-end process with named internal/external subject matter experts. Build in response times, such that the turn around time on conflicts (issues / disputes) can be managed and the impact on the critical path can be assessed

When quality of communication goes down, ambiguity goes up, cost goes up and the project timeline come under huge pressure. Avoid that and set your team up for success by implementing a robust framework of communication processes, procedures, methods and tools. Train your project staff along the way and lead by example.

Bas de Baat

Program Manager Enterprise Applications, PMP© 

Charisma and Pragmatic Project Leadership…

People may hear your words, but they feel your attitude – John Maxwell

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John Maxwell is a well-known American author of more than 75 books primarily about Leadership. Recently I listened to his audio book “Be a People Person: Effective Leadership Through Effective Relationships” [2014] and liked his simple and practical interpretation of Charisma.

To start of, he is referring to Merriam Webster encyclopedia’s definition, which says: “Charisma is a personal magic of leadership arousing special popular loyalty or enthusiasm”.

He also mentions that Charisma is a trade or quality that can be learned and developed, because it basically is a result of strong and effective communication and interpersonal relationship skills. That is important to know!

To completely take it away from the mystical, illusive and indefinable side, he breaks it down into eight different values:

C – concern
H – help
A – action
R – results
I – influence
S – sensitivity
M – motivation
A – affirmation

What do these values mean for the Pragmatic Project Leader? To come to that answer, I will share John Maxwell’s definition for each of the items first (cursive text) and than address them.

Charisma and Pragmatic Project Leadership, let’s break it down.

Concern (the ability to care)Charismatic people are truly concerned about people’s deepest needs and interests. They truly care and leave you feeling important.

There are a number of things that can you can do as a Pragmatic Project Leader in this area. One of them is to ‘listen with empathy’. When you are concerned with the well being of one of your team members or perhaps the entire team, you want to sit down and have a positive conversation where you primarily listen and are very mindful of the situation. Sometimes listening and acknowledging the situation is enough and all of what is being asked from you. Sometimes it entails more, in which case you often take on a coaching role and help the individual or team to think, change and achieve specific goals. Key is that you demonstrate your concern by sharing the right thoughts, speaking the right words and taking the right actions. Always handle with care and an appropriate level of discretion.

‘Standing for the team’ is another quality that you must have as Pragmatic Project Leader. Regardless of the team performance, whether is good, bad or excellent, you are always responsible for the outcome. Taking responsibility is a way of demonstrating to the team and all the other stakeholders that you care about them and that you are the orchestrator of what they do and deliver. Taking responsibility in this case has two meanings. Aside from the fact that the team is following the path that you set out for them, you are also responsible for taking corrective actions on a timely basis. A key aspect of that is the learning component. If you care about the team, you want to avoid that situations have a reoccurrence. Sitting down with the team and do a quick and effective lessons learned session is what you want to do.

Help (the ability to reach out)Charismatic people help other people with their problems. They inspire them to face their problems and offer creative solutions and hope.

The best way to reach out as Pragmatic Project Leader is to coach the person through the problem solving process, starting with awareness, assessment and acceptance. Before you move forward to the resolution phase, you want the person to accept the problem as that demonstrates ownership and skin in the game, which is needed to get into a winners mood. Once you have reached that stage it is time to set goals, create and discuss options, change and make things happen. There are a number of coaching models that you can follow. Max Landsberg describes a GROW model in is book “The TAO of coaching” [2003]

Action (the ability to make things happen) – Charismatic people are never boring. They are always creative and confident in the way they present ideas or solutions.

One of my previous posts describe key characteristics of the Pragmatic Project Leader. The ability to make things happen is in my mind based on the following aspects. Pragmatic Project Leaders have a detailed understanding of the vision and future state originally set by the Business Leader. With that understanding they are able to decompose the vision into a roadmap, timeline and actionable work packages. In other words they are far-sighted and have a plan to deliver the intended solution. Throughout the execution phase, Pragmatic Project Leaders are connecting the dots, pro actively responding to change, while keeping the project on track. In doing so, they are providing solutions that at times are creative, unique and tailored to the business context.

Results (the ability to produce) – Charismatic people are other-centered and genuinely wish for other people to succeed. This trait inspires productivity in people

Pragmatic Project Leaders are people and result-oriented at the same time. They are very capable of finding the right work-life balance for the team and often care less about how and where work gets done as long as it gets done. Delivering results and making quick wins to demonstrate performance is a key element of their overall project approach. They communicate results upwards in the chain of command frequently and clearly articulate the contribution of key individuals and teams.  Pragmatic Project Leaders understand that celebrating success and sharing the joy of making things happen collectively is the best multivitamin you can give to the team to boost productivity. Once you hit the first milestone, you want to hit the next and…

Influence (the ability to lead) – Charismatic people are natural leaders. They know how to influence people and make them follow their lead.

Pragmatic Project Leaders excel in verbal and non-verbal communications. Their intentions are transparent and they are keen on communicating what, why and how in a constructive and timely manner to the right stakeholders. Oftentimes they use visualization as a method of sharing information, because they realize that ‘pictures speak a thousand words’. Pragmatic Project Leaders understand the power of the informal network that any organization has and they are able to make it a meaningful instrument for the project and use it in achieving project goals, resolving issues and managing risks. As required, they are not shy of taking bold actions to keep the project on track. They are persistent in finding the right answers. This kind of behaviour tends to entice people and that is exactly why Pragmatic Project Leaders demonstrate it in a consistent manner

Sensitivity (the ability to feel and respond) – Charismatic people are sensitive to changing situations. They are adept at responding appropriately to the mood, feeling, and spirit of any situation.

‘Being ahead of the change curve’ is a quality that Pragmatic Project Leaders master. Because they always operate with the future state in mind, they understand what change is coming on their path and when. Pragmatic Project Leaders are successful when they give equal importance to people, process and technology. They understand that the vision can only be achieved when organizational change is marching ahead of process and technology change. Building trust within the organization, within the project team and with external stakeholders about what is to come is crucial to manifest the project goals. Pragmatic Project Leaders are well positioned to coach Business Leaders in initializing, planning, executing and communicating change as they have the helicopter view across the building blocks of the future state. As mentioned above, they are able to connect the dots at all times.

Motivation (the ability to give hope) – Charismatic people are good motivators. They are good at encouraging, believing, and supporting people in the face of despair and adversities.

Pragmatic Project Leaders understand what the team finds important and uses that as a motivator. This can differ by country, client, organization and project. They are mindful of the interest of the people and business context and offer realistic options when hurdles need to be taken. Because they are far-sighted and know how to get to the future state, they help the team to go through difficult times and overcome obstacles. Pragmatic Project Leaders are knowledgeable of people, process and technology dynamics and can motivate the team by providing a cohesive perspective on where things are, why they are where they are, and were things are going. They know that motivators are sometimes just small incentives and they are able to offer them at the right time with the right impact to the right people or team.

Affirmation (the ability to build up) – Charismatic people are good at acknowledging the accomplishments of other people. They think the best, believe the best, and express the best in others.

Acknowledging the performance and contribution of people is without a doubt one of the most important aspects of leadership. Pragmatic Project Leaders are keen on saying ‘Thank You!’ They want people to grow in their work and life and continuously help where and whenever they can. Oftentimes that is through a coaching. Sometimes people think that affirmation is equal to pizza lunches, parties or other form of social gatherings. It is good to have those kind of events for sure, but foremost and above all, it is key to understand that affirmation is as simple as a few nice words often with a bit of humour. Affirmation must be simple, must be frequent.

Now do you need to qualify on all of the eight values with the same level of proficiency before you become that person with that magnetic charm? I don’t think so. Your personality, knowledge, experience and preferences will make you excel more on certain values than others. And that is perfectly fine as long as overall your performance is such that you are able to make other people feel good about themselves, rather than to make them feel good about you. If people feel good about themselves and there are no obstacles for them to perform, they directly contribute positively to the outcome of the project. At that point you have done your job as Pragmatic Project Leader.

Bas de Baat

Program Manager Enterprise Applications, PMP©

Pick the right people!

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In 2002, Colin Powell, an American statesman and retired four-star general in the United States Army, published one of his bestsellers: “The Powell Principles: 24 lessons from Colin Powell, a Legendary Leader.” The lessons are concise, clear, straightforward and very valuable to any Leader. If you have the opportunity to read this book, please do so. I am sure you will enjoy it as I did.

What are the 24 lessons? I am listing them here below so you get an idea of  what Powell is talking about. For this blog post, I am selecting 3 of them and share my opinion with you of how a Pragmatic Project Leader can best apply them. Here is the full list:

  1. Promote a clash of ideas
  2. Be prepared to piss people off
  3. Establish trust
  4. Walk the talk
  5. Pick the right people
  6. Listen
  7. Be vigilant in details
  8. Be a disorganizer
  9. Check your ego at the door
  10. Let change lead growth
  11. Seek consensus (but don’t be ruled by it)
  12. Fit no stereotypes
  13. Simplify
  14. Let situation dictate strategy
  15. Push the envelope
  16. Close with the enemy
  17. View People as partners
  18. Challenge the pros
  19. Don’t rely on charts and title
  20. Trust those in the trenches
  21. Make optimism a top priority
  22. Have fun in your command
  23. Strive for balance
  24. Prepare to be lonely

I can tell you that it wasn’t easy to select 3 lessons learned, as most of them are intriguing and worthwhile to address. Because I have talked about trust in one of my previous posts, I did not select ‘Establish Trust’, however my opinion is that this is the most prominent critical success factor of a project. What I did select is the following:

  1. Pick the right people
  2. Listen
  3. Let change lead growth

 

Pick the right people

 People aren’t just a piece of the puzzle, they are the puzzle. Or more accurately, they’re the solution to the puzzle – Colin Powell

Picking the right people for your project team is crucial. It is almost as important as establishing and maintaining trust. That’s a topic I have published a post about before. But how do you pick the right people as a practical project leader? That is not an easy task. Sometimes you come in when the selection has been completed and people have been assigned to the project. Making changes at that point in time is hard to do. In that case, do a thorough assessment and notify the Executive of potential skill gaps and risks you have identified. Most likely the Executive assembled the team, or at least approved it. Escalating your concerns to the Executive in a structured and informative manner is all you can do. After that: start rowing with the team you have! If you do have the option to build your team from scratch, think about the following.

Understand the complexities of the solution, the organization, the culture and the business context before you start with defining the required skill set and mix you need in order to deliver. If the initiative that you are leading has a substantial business transformation component, you want to make sure that the people you select are aligned with the vision of the end state that you are going to move towards. They must believe in the ‘product’ that the project is about to deliver. If you don’t have that certainty, you are probably going to feel pretty lonely soon and struggle with manifesting the change. As orchestrator you want people in your team that want and can sing from the same song sheet. They must be able to identify themselves with the notes and the lyrics.

How do you make sure that you are looking for the right skills? If you don’t know that for sure that’s perfectly fine, you just need to consult an expert in those particular areas and ask for input. Executives expect you to assemble the right team, not to have deep expertise in all aspects. Feel good when you don’t know as long as you are aware of it. Once you have defined the right skill set, there is one other step to take before you can start the recruitment process. You want to attract people that have the right attitude, values and beliefs. Ultimately, we all know that any team performs and delivers when people work well together. It sounds simple and it truly is. As Pragmatic Project Leader you want to work with people that are intelligent, humble and hungry. It is not only about knowledge and experience, it is also about personality. Teams perform well when personalities match. Too often I see that selections are made on the candidates resume and much less on the fit with the team. Intelligence and being humble need no further clarification. Being hungry does. What does that mean? People who have a motivated interest in joining your project and want to take the extra mile to deliver, are the ones who are hungry and are the ones you want to have in your team. They will become your front runners. When the going gets tough, they will step up and safe your bacon. Consider selecting a candidate who has less knowledge and experience, but who is humble and hungry, because that’s something that you cannot change and you have to live with that.

Once you have selected your team players, the journey begins.  Your responsibility is shifting towards managing the team and coaching each of the players such that their individual talents grow and their output and contribution to the project gets optimized. In every project that I have been part of, the team is going through ups and downs, through stages of development. As Pragmatic Project Leader you must be aware of that team dynamic and your role is to manage the relationships between the players. It is your moral obligation to grow people in their careers. That is often one of the motivations why people want to join your project.

Psychologist Bruce Tuckman came up with the memorable phrase “forming, storming, norming, and performing” in his 1965 article, “Development Sequence in Small Groups.” He used it to describe the path that most teams follow on their way to high performance. Later, he added a fifth stage, “adjourning.” If you aren’t familiar with that concept, I recommend to read it. In my future posts about team performance, I will come back on it

Listen

Good listening begets good listening. Ideas get exchanged faster and more reliable – Colin Powell

Or like Stephen Covey said: ‘Seek first to understand, then to be understood.” As practical project leader you are in a lot of meetings, conference calls, conversations and other forms of gatherings, where a lot of information is being exchanged each and every day.

Now, how often are you in a meeting where you notice that people are simply not listening, and over time topics circle back over and over again? As practical project leader you want to intervene when that happens. The best way to do that is to listen actively, thoroughly grasp the subject and speak up at the right moment. When is that? When your gut tells you to. When you speak up paraphrase what you have been listening to and ask for confirmation from the people participating in the discussion. Make it an inclusive discussion by inviting people to speak up who have been quiet before. You want to do that with people who have a serious stake in the outcome of the meeting. It is your responsibility as Pragmatic Project Leader that the right people participate, listen, speak up and make timely decisions.

There are in my mind two very effective ways to obtain valuable information that benefits the project by putting on your listening hat. The first one that I am a strong advocate of is what is often called ‘management by walking around.’ You are engaging with individuals or group of individuals on the project floor in an informal way and asks open questions about work and life. These meetings can have positive side effects as well like team motivation, team integration and collaboration. The second one that I find effective and often have are 1:1 coaching sessions, where you help improve the talented individual by making a connection between performance, contribution to the project, career development and aspirations in life. Coaching can become a fascinating aspect of practical project leadership. If you want to read more about coaching, search for books and/or articles about the GROW model.

Let change lead growth

Leaders need to encourage a philosophy in which change becomes equivalent to growth and growth becomes equivalent to satisfaction – Colin Powell

It is imperative that if you want to achieve your dreams you must change. Think.Change.Achieve is the core concept of PM Consult. Organizational change management is a key component of our advisory services. The capability to manifest ‘Change’ through an IT business transformation project is as important as expertise of business process and technology design and delivery (the solution). But why do organizations not treat it as such when they initiate new projects?

Oftentimes there is a lot of talk about organizational change management, but it hardly translates in concrete, consistent action plans that leadership follows through. There is no shortage of opinions of what must change, who must change by when and what happens if change does not occur. Having said all of that, it seems that organizations  have little experience of how you make ‘Change’ happen. Not giving ‘Change’ the right priority is really too bad and unnecessary. One of the symptoms of a failing organizational change management team is that they only perform ‘communication activities’, whereas the core focus should be on alignment, commitment, transformation and implementation.

If you read literature about why projects fail, the organization’s inability to change is over and over again mentioned as a root cause. I think that one of the reasons why this happens is that organizations do not value change management activities as they should, because it is hard to make its effectiveness tangible. It is not an easy task to find a correlation between for example ‘executive alignment sessions’ and the organization materializing the vision of the end state.

There is a saying “without great risk, no great reward”. Organizations that want to move to a new, promising future end state must change and therefore intrinsically must take risk.  And that is exactly where the problem lies. Typically organizations are risk averse and only want to pursue activities that can be planned in detail and tightly managed.  Organizational change management does not fall in that category. On the contrary, business process and technology design and delivery, the more tangible aspects of an IT business transformation, do. Organizational change management must always be ahead of the curve, meaning it starts ahead of business process and technology design and delivery.

How can we change this situation? Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Make the business case! An investment in change multiplies investments in business process and technology and therefore overall business value of the initiative
  2. Formulate a transparent, action oriented change management plan. Sell that plan, get alignment and commitment
  3. Recruit adequately skilled organizational change management experts on your project and follow their advice
  4. Assign a change leader who is comfortable to take great risk when necessary. Actively manage risks in favour of achieving the goals and future end state. Ideally the visionary leader that I talked about in one of my previous posts is that change leader
  5. Make the execution of the change management plan a productive journey with meaningful deliverables that contribute to the success of the project. Make it an instrumental part of project status meetings and Executive briefings

Change is fun. That is the exciting part of IT business transformation projects. Embrace and it pays off.

Bas de Baat

Program Manager Enterprise Applications, PMP©